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KB-1876: Cannot create Kerberos tickets using Centrify OpenSSH

Centrify DirectControl ,  

9 August,16 at 08:48 AM

Applies to: All versions of Centrify DirectControl on the following platforms:

a) RHEL 6.1, 6.2
b) Debian 6
c) Ubuntu 11.10
d) Fedora Core FC17.
e) Oracle Linux EL
f) OpenSuSE 12.1
g) CentOS 6.3

Question:
After following KB-2526: Cannot create consistently forwardable Kerberos tickets using Centrify OpenSSH and getting the special build of Centrify DirectControl, SSO is working for the above mentioned platforms but no Kerberos ticket is getting created. klist shows no ticket is being created.

Is there any reason for this?

Answer:
This is not really a Centrify issue but a PAM configuration change on the OS in question.

The pam_fprintd.so entry needs to be commented out as follows:

a) On RHEL 6.1, 6.2, Oracle Linux 6.x, CentOS 6.3, Scientific Linux 6.x:

Comment out pam_fprintd.so in the etc/pam.d/system-auth file

b) On Ubuntu 11.10 and Debian 6: 

Comment out pam_ck_connector.so nox11 in the /etc/pam.d/common-session file

c) On Fedora 17:

Comment out pam_fprintd.so and pam_systemd.so in the /etc/pam.d/system-auth file

d) On Opensuse 12.1: 

Comment out pam_systemd.so in the /etc/pam.d/common-session file

The pam_fprintd.so is for the pam of the finger printer reader service. After the above changes, Centrify DirectControl and SSH should be restarted before attempting SSO.

 

 

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